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Unity and Solidarity: How Aflatoun’s partners reach the most vulnerable

Posted in Blogs on December 18, 2020

International Human Solidarity Day is an annual Unity Day of the United Nations and its member states introduced by the General Assembly during the 2005 World Summit. The theme and basic purpose of the Solidarity Day are to eradicate poverty and promote the culture of cooperation, equality and social justice.

According to the United Nations, the International Human Solidarity Day is:

  • a day to celebrate our unity in diversity;
  • a day to remind governments to respect their commitments to international agreements;
  • a day to raise public awareness of the importance of solidarity;
  • a day to encourage debate on the ways to promote solidarity for the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals including poverty eradication;
  • a day of action to encourage new initiatives for poverty eradication.

On this day, Aflatoun International wants to emphasise the important work of our local partner organisations and highlight their role in challenging global poverty, social injustice and discrimination by reaching out the most vulnerable children and young people across the globe.

Aflatoun’s global network consists of hundreds of established and local grassroots organisations, NGOs and governmental institutions who collaborate with us to receive child-centred social and financial curricula that are tailored to their specific local needs and wishes.  Many of these partner organisations work with the most vulnerable and marginalised children and young people.

During our recently-held online Asia Regional Meeting, we discussed the ways in which our local partners use our social and financial education programmes to reach the most vulnerable children and young people. They showed us outstanding examples of their implementation of the Aflatoun curricula, shared success stories and discussed some of the challenges and opportunities for the future.

Case of Indigenous Children in Sind Province, Pakistan

Primary Education Project Pakistan (PEP Pakistan) is a foundation dedicated to providing quality education to children and young people. Mithu Naroo, the project officer at PEP, who belongs to a marginalised community himself, joined our meeting to discuss their work in Sind Province of Pakistan. PEP Pakistan works with indigenous children who are referred to as tribal children, living in the rural areas of Sind Province. The majority of these children are extremely vulnerable: they are isolated or belong to the lowest social and economic class in the society. Naroo explained that these children and young people are ignored and remain unseen by the majority of the society in Pakistan.

PEP has introduced Aflatoun’ social and financial education programmes to almost 6.5 thousand children of the most marginalised communities in 125 village schools and trained 140 teachers. Their goal is to empower these children to become the agents of change and role models within their communities. Naroo explained that the most visible impact of Aflatoun programmes amongst the children and young people was an increase in saving habits, self-confidence, improvement in living conditions, interest in personal development and in learning about the rights.

PEP has introduced Aflatoun’ social and financial education programmes to almost 6.5 thousand children of the most marginalised communities in 125 village schools and trained 140 teachers.

Case of stateless children living in the margins of society

Another example of reaching out to the most vulnerable children comes from Malaysia. Humana Child Aid Society Sabah is a social non-profit that educates thousands of children, who live on plantations and other remote areas far from schools in the Malaysian state Sabah, Borneo.

The executive director, Dayang Jainal joined the meeting to talk about how they reach out to children who are heavily discriminated and denied of their basic human rights. Because of their lack of legal status in the country, these children are not able to receive formal education. Humana Child Aid Society primarily works with children who do not have access to education because of distance, affordability and/or legal status.

Humana Child Aid Society Sabah integrates five core elements of Aflatoun’s curricula to their lessons: personal exploration, planning and budgeting, rights and responsibilities, saving and spending, and social & financial enterprise.

 

Case of Underprivileged Children of Sahay, India

Children International Sahay also used Aflatoun Curriculum in order to develop life skills and increase social responsibility of children and youth from the poorest communities.

Children International (CI) is an NGO that helps impoverished children overcome the effects of poverty, support their education, and prepare youth to contribute to society. SAHAY is an affiliate of Children International in India, currently working in 9 districts of West Bengal and 11 city regions of Kolkata.

 

Children International Sahay works with underprivileged children through a Child Sponsorship Programme, both in the rural and urban area in West Bengal, India. The Sponsorship programme focuses on the holistic development of children and youth aged 3-19 years through an integrated approach. Their goal is to empower every child to make sure they are healthy, well educated and eventually employed.

Sukhendu Santra, Children International’s Empowerment Programmes Coordinator, explained that CI Sahay focuses on developing life and social responsibility skills in underprivileged children and young people through Aflatoun’s programmes. Through the implementation of Aflatoun programmes, they aim to bring up a generation of children and young people who are effective communicators and who are able to think creatively and critically. Santra noted that they observed an outstanding increase in saving habits, appreciation of diversity and caring for the community amongst their students who received Aflatoun programmes. As of 2019, CI Sahay has reached over 10 thousand children and young people with our programme.

Children International Sahay observed an outstanding increase in saving habits, appreciation of diversity and caring for the community amongst their students who received Aflatoun programmes.

These are just a few examples of the incredible work our partners do every day to reach out to the most vulnerable children and youth around the world with the Aflatoun programmes. On this special day, we want to say that we stand together with our partners and support the common goal of bringing quality education to as many vulnerable children as possible. Join us and let’s create a ripple effect of positive change in the lives of children, youth and their communities for a more equitable world!

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